John Thompson Death

Georgetown Basketball Head Coach John Thompson Passed away at 78

Sports World
Views: 385
0 0
Read Time:1 Minute, 50 Second

Former Georgetown University coach John Thompson has died at the age of 78, according to several reports. Thompson lived in Georgetown from 1972 to 1999. He set a record of 596–239 (.714) of in Georgetown. Also, he was instrumental in the rise of the Big East Conference. When he enrolled in a youth center called Patrick Ewing in 1981, he made Georgetown a national power.

Hoys went to the NCAA final four three times in Ewing’s four years at Georgetown. In 1984, Georgetown won the NCAA Championship which made Thompson the first African-American coach to win the trophy in college basketball.

Success of African-American coach

Thompson defended players’ rights with a walkout to oppose Proposition 48 in 19 In, which would prevent players from playing as new players if they fail to get eligible SAT scores. He looked at Prop 48 and specifically saw the standardized trials as racially biased.

However, Thompson has awarded the National Coach twice and the Big East Coach three times. In 1988, he led the American basketball team to the Olympics and only lost to the Soviet Union. This was the last time the United States sent a team of college athletes to the Olympics.

Successive career of Thompson

Thompson grew up in Washington, D.C., and played at Archbishop Carroll High School. He played at Providence College and selected by the Boston Celtics in the NBA Draft in 1964.64. However, he spent two years with the Celtics and supported Bill Russell on two teams in the NBA Championship.

He worked as a head coach at St. Anthony’s High School, DC. On his return he trained there for six years and his team grew to 122-28 before getting a job in Georgetown.

Thompson’s most brave action came in the year 1989 when he called for a meeting in the coach’s meeting room for the horrific drug kingpin Rayful Edmond III. He has inducted Springfield, Mass, and the NCAA College Hall of Fame into the Nasmith Memorial basketball hall of fame.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %